No.223: Satellite of Love

ARTIST
Lin Zhipeng

CURATORs
Steven Dragonn Kelvin Huang Yiqun

EXHIBITION DATES
Aug 12 – Sep 20, 2020

GALLERY HOURS
Tu–F: 2 pm–6 pm; Sa: 11 am–6 pm; M, Su: closed

Capture Photography Festival 2020 Official Selected Exhibition
Please note that this exhibition is by appointment only. Book your visit here

***

Satellite of Love is the title of a rock ’n roll song composed by Lou Reed in 1970, when he was still part of The Velvet Underground. The song describes a man watching a satellite launch on television while feeling “the worst kind of jealousy” about his unfaithful girlfriend. It resonated with the hippie movement along with the influence of the Beat generation, a youth movement in the 1950s characterized by underground and anti-conformist art and literature in New York, starred by Kerouac among others.

The wave of the Beat Generation had great influence on China’s post-‘80 generation, especially in South China, along with J-pop and Hong Kong subculture. No.223 (Lin Zhipeng) is certainly a pilgrim. Inspired by Wong Kar-Wai’s film, Chungking Express, Lin named himself “No. 223,” intending to evoke a poetic and dream-like aura, as well as the feeling of loneliness and mystery characterized by this film. Lin offers an alternative point of view on youth in a relatively conservative Chinese culture. In an indifferent and fast-changing society, his spontaneous photography portrays a young generation indulged in love and life, oscillating between jubilation and deep melancholy, playful sexuality and a basic human need to be loved.

Inspired by the song, Satellite of Love is also the title of No.223’s book, a photography-poetry album published in 2012. “No. 223 is a visual version of Kerouac” described by Hong Huang, a renowned editor in China, “Like Dean in On the Road, he is always asking: ‘What’s your road, man?—holyboy road, madman road, rainbow road, guppy road, any road. It’s an anywhere road for anybody anyhow. Where body how?’ His photography invites you on this road of discovery.”

This exhibition contains work that may not be suitable for some viewers.

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